Mosh pit Mona

 

 

We went to the Louvre during our trip to Europe this past summer. While it had been a while since our last visit, some things hadn’t changed Continue reading “Mosh pit Mona”

Bringing narrative to minimalism: A big thank you to Herb and Dorothy Vogel

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An exciting find: Don Judd’s Untitled work from 1965, a piece from the Vogel collection on exhibit at the National Gallery of Art, East Building.

Abstract art is the kind of experience that challenges a viewer to find words to describe. Minimalism, the art movement based on simple forms, may pose the starkest of these challenges. Continue reading “Bringing narrative to minimalism: A big thank you to Herb and Dorothy Vogel”

Hirshorn’s “Pulse”: Experiencing the heartbeat of karma

IMG_2680The Hirshorn Museum (Smithsonian’s modern art building) presented another wow exhibit, one that gave enough material for long-lasting, multi-level reflection. RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER: PULSE (November 1, 2018 – April 28, 2019) engaged the observer in a way that is as much peculiar as it is tantalizing. Continue reading “Hirshorn’s “Pulse”: Experiencing the heartbeat of karma”

Color biographies

IMG_2032Everyone’s got a story. And, in “The Secret Lives of Color”, Kassia St. Clair gives colors with names befitting those delightful paint squares their autobiographical due. There’s White with some of its cousins including Lead White, Ivory, Silver, Whitewash, Isabelline, Chalk, Beige and Red with its associates Scarlet, Cochineal, Vermillion, Rossa corsa, Hematite, Madder, and Dragon’s blood for example.

Continue reading “Color biographies”

Gibsonian optics brought to life in the sculpture of Fred Eversley

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An inviting pool, expectation of ripples if one were to touch. Structured resin becomes fluid and inviting.

J.J. Gibson outlined a radical approach to optics in his 1979 book The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. In order to perceive the structure of space, we need just one thing: light.  Continue reading “Gibsonian optics brought to life in the sculpture of Fred Eversley”

Depth cues are psychological constructs (we cannot rely upon when painting still life).

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Tasked with painting a still life composed of boxes and bottles in shades of white and black, with oil paints in shades of white and black, it’s easy for a scientist like me to think about the usual suspects of depth cues as a path to success. After all, if depth cues are what we use to interpret the environment, then using them should translate to a successful painting, paint skill notwithstanding. Continue reading “Depth cues are psychological constructs (we cannot rely upon when painting still life).”